Ill Effects - Autonomous Cars & Motion Sickness

Atomotive-testing-technology-internationalOne of the biggest concerns of self-driving cars is the likelihood of them causing kinetosis in occupants. ATTI speaks to developers about how they are working to alleviate the issue. 

Kinetosis, better known as travel sickness, has afflicted travelers since the era of horse-drawn carriages. Fortunately, it is now only the unlucky passenger that suffers, but in future autonomous vehicles, kinetosis is expected to be more of an issue than in today's conventional cars. One of the lauded benefits of self-driving vehicles will be their potential to ease time spent in transit, offering occupants the option to read, work or watch a movie - but such activities could result in the individual feeling queasy.  

driving-simulator-test-motion-sickness

Phil Morse, international manager at simulation specialist Ansible Motion and former dynamics engineer, concurs:  "It's the slow movements that really cause the problems, but the effect can be eliminated, as we have discovered in our simulator labs...", he says.  

Read the full article on Automotive Testing Technology International.

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About Ansible Motion

Founded in 2009, Ansible Motion creates and deploys technology associated with the physical and logical simulation of human-directed vehicles. We offer a range of automotive Driver-in-the-Loop (DIL) simulators featuring advanced computational and mechanical performance capabilities, and industry-unique motion and immersion solutions that create compelling virtual worlds for drivers and product development engineers.

Ansible Motion DIL simulators are used by automotive and research organisations around the globe to place real people into direct contact with imagined vehicles, on-board systems and situations. Our DIL simulators are designed, built and developed at our factory and R&D Centre in Hethel, England.